Check out the articles on this page to increase your outdoor skills and knowledge. You can find many different hiking tips here. Have you ever been in a lightning storm or lost in the wilderness with limited ideas of what to do? Maybe you’re wondering what you should bring on your next camping trip – check out The Colorado Hiker’s gear checklists, gear reviews, and backcountry recipes.

Wilderness Safety Information

Hiking Tips & Backpacking Information

 

Plan Ahead

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A GREAT HIKE OR A TRIP TO THE HOSPITAL IS UP TO YOU!

Hiking and backpacking are all about planning and preparation – self-reliance and good choices are crucial. Don’t hike alone is probably one of the best hiking tips. Know what your destination will be and how to get there. Know where water is available. Get the weather forecast. Don’t overestimate your capabilities. Hike intelligently. You are responsible for your own safety as well as that of everyone in your party. Stay on the trail and never shortcut switchbacks.

Be Kind to Yourself

KNOW YOUR ABILITIES; CHOOSE AN APPROPRIATE HIKE.

Be conservative in planning your hike! If you have asthma, diabetes, a heart condition, knee or back problems, or any other health or medical issue, limit your exertion and exposure. Stay within your training, physical limitations, and abilities.

Carry Less (But Always Bring the Essentials)

THE LESS YOU CARRY, THE MORE ENJOYABLE THE HIKE.

Travel as light as possible. The heaviest items in your pack should be food and water. Use hiking sticks to take stress off your legs. Wear well-fitting and broken-in hiking boots. Bring a small lightweight flashlight and a change of batteries and bulb. Wear sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat. Bring a map, compass, signal mirror or whistle, first aid kit, and water purification tablets. Keep in mind that all trash (including biodegradable) needs to be carried out.

Take Breaks

TAKE A TEN MINUTE BREAK AT LEAST ONCE EVERY HOUR.

A break of ten minutes helps remove the metabolic waste products that build up in your legs while hiking. Take a break at least every hour. Sit down and prop your legs up. Eat some food, drink some fluids, and take this time to enjoy and appreciate the view. These efficient breaks can recharge your batteries. In the long run, breaks will not slow you down.

Fuel Up!

DRINK FREQUENTLY AND EAT OFTEN.

Eat and drink more than you normally do. Eat before, during, and after your hike. Eat before you are hungry. Drink before you are thirsty. No matter what the temperature, you need water and energy to keep going. For every hour hiking in the canyon, you should drink ½ to 1 quart (liter) of water or sports drink.

Your best defense against illness and exhaustion is to eat a healthy breakfast, a full lunch, a snack every time you take a drink, and a rewarding full dinner at the end of the day. This is not a time to diet.